Indiana CTSI https://www.indianactsi.org Accelerating Clinical and Translational Research Thu, 21 Jun 2018 16:16:59 -0400 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.6 https://www.indianactsi.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/favicon-100x100.png Indiana CTSI https://www.indianactsi.org 32 32 Discovering the Power in Diabetes Prevention https://www.indianactsi.org/discovering-power-diabetes-prevention/ Tue, 20 Feb 2018 05:48:23 +0000 https://www.indianactsi.org/?p=3565 3 minute read Research Jam brought together youth, parents, and community members who work with families, to build a PowerHouse. You walk into a gloomy room with no light. You sit down in a chair and face a stage where someone starts to say something about health. You try to say hey to your friend …

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3 minute read

Research Jam brought together youth, parents, and community members who work with families, to build a PowerHouse.

PowerHouse

You walk into a gloomy room with no light. You sit down in a chair and face a stage where someone starts to say something about health. You try to say hey to your friend a few seats away, but you hear a “shhhhhh!” The person at the front of the room is still talking but you’ve lost the will to pay attention. All you hear is “blah, blah blah.” Your stomach rumbles. People around you yawn and fidget. No one asks your opinion and it’ll be another hour before you can get up from your seat. And you just know there will be some kind of worksheet at the end. They said this diabetes prevention program would be fun, but it’s just the worst. [Program description based on drawings by youth of the “worst diabetes prevention program ever”.]

According to data from the American Diabetes Association, the rate of prediabetes (higher than normal blood sugar levels that can turn into type 2 diabetes), is 35.6% of the people in Indiana. That’s more than 1 in every 3 people. Prediabetes and diabetes are both starting to be more and more common in children. The good news is that prediabetes can be stopped or slowed down with healthy changes in diet and exercise. The bad news is that getting people to make these kinds of changes can be really hard. There are many programs to help people make healthy changes to prevent diabetes. Some of these programs have worked well for adults. But there aren’t many programs made with youth in mind. Dr. Tamara Hannon, a doctor who works with kids with diabetes, asked Research Jam for help to make a program with youth and families. We all worked together to make a diabetes prevention program that’s based on what doctors know works, but is made with youth in mind.

Research Jam brought together youth, parents, and community members who work with families to imagine what this new program could be.

We learned three important things about how youth think about health: (1) Youth are cool with being healthy, but there are other things that are more important to them like making friends and having fun. (2) Their options for making healthy choices (especially with food) are often controlled by other people like their schools and their parents. (3) They hear about how to be healthy in places like school where they get lots of lectures and it’s sometimes really boring. As one teen said: Even if it’s really fun, I feel like if you’re like ‘Oh we’ve got vegetables…and we’re doing this program,’ I feel like that gets boring…People would be like, ‘Um I’m probably not going.’

Research Jam needed to do two things to make the program work for youth: (1) Make the program actually fun; not fake fun and (2) Make health more about ‘what you want to do’ and not about what you’re ‘supposed to do.’

With this idea in mind, Research Jam named the program PowerHouse.

Don't Let Them

PowerHouse is about making youth feel powerful by helping them see that they deserve to be healthy, by helping them create their own healthy lifestyle that works for them, and by bringing them together with people who can help them build the life they want. Diabetes prevention comes from these kinds of choices but it isn’t the main focus.

We were inspired by the Truth campaign and their ideas about helping teens stay away from smoking by rebelling against the tobacco companies and DJ Khaled’s Snapchats about the keys to reaching success even though “they” don’t want you to. These two ideas (empowerment and rebellion) were the focus of PowerHouse’s message to teens.

To find out more about PowerHouse, visit www.wearepowerhouse.org or @WeArePowerHouse on Facebook.


This article first appeared on the Research Jam blog.

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Meet CHeP Advisory Board Chair Angie Abbott https://www.indianactsi.org/meet-chep-advisory-board-chair-angie-abbott/ Tue, 20 Feb 2018 05:14:02 +0000 https://www.indianactsi.org/?p=3559 1 minute read The Board Chair has been an outstanding member of the CHeP Advisory Board since 2012. In her primary role, Angie Abbott is the Assistant Dean of Purdue’s College of Health and Human Sciences as well as the Associate Director for Purdue Extension College of Health and Human Sciences. As a registered dietitian she …

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1 minute read

The Board Chair has been an outstanding member of the CHeP Advisory Board since 2012.

Angie Abbott
Angie Abbott

In her primary role, Angie Abbott is the Assistant Dean of Purdue’s College of Health and Human Sciences as well as the Associate Director for Purdue Extension College of Health and Human Sciences. As a registered dietitian she is also an Extension Specialist in the area of nutrition education programs that target limited resource audiences. She has professional experience in the areas of education, research, community and clinical practice.

Angie received a Bachelor of Science degree in dietetics and also completed a Master’s degree and a post-graduate dietetic internship all through Ball State University before receiving her Doctoral degree in Educational Leadership from Creighton University.

At Purdue, Angie has directed the SNAP-Education program, the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program and outreach efforts in the Nutrition Science Department. She is active in several professional organizations, including the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the Indiana Nutrition Council, and the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior.

Recognized for her hard work, Angie has received the “Member Media Award” from the Indiana Dietetic Association and the Emerging Professional Award of Merit given on behalf of the Ball State University Alumni Association.

When Angie is not working she is a full-time “dance mom” and “baseball mom”.

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Opportunity to Partner with IU Occupational Therapy https://www.indianactsi.org/opportunity-partner-iu-occupational-therapy/ Fri, 16 Feb 2018 19:02:16 +0000 https://www.indianactsi.org/?p=3553 There is an exciting opportunity to partner with the Indiana University School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Department of Occupational Therapy as they launch their Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.  An integral aspect of the program is the development of an independent scholarly project and an advanced-skill doctoral experience. What does that mean? It means …

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There is an exciting opportunity to partner with the Indiana University School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Department of Occupational Therapy as they launch their Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.  An integral aspect of the program is the development of an independent scholarly project and an advanced-skill doctoral experience. What does that mean? It means that the graduate students in the program will work with community partners to learn and serve at the same time. Community partners are foundations and businesses servicing populations in need as well as clinical sites providing rehabilitation services. The objective of the doctoral experiential is to gain advanced skills and conduct a project in areas such as research, program development, leadership, and advocacy.

The doctoral experience takes place at the end of an intensive three-year program and lasts for four months (full-time). The student works with a site mentor (content expert) and faculty to develop and carry out their project. This is a great opportunity for community organizations to partner with IU occupational therapy and help students gain advanced skills to participate in community-based programs. Please contact Dr. Christine Kroll, Director of Pre-Doctoral Residency & Fieldwork, to discuss this opportunity.

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December Newsletter https://www.indianactsi.org/december-newsletter/ Fri, 15 Dec 2017 15:16:08 +0000 https://www.indianactsi.org/?p=3355 Happy Holidays from CHeP! Check out our newsletter for the latest funding, events and other opportunities we’ve found for you. Newsletter Link http://mailchi.mp/cf23b267c1e3/latest-news-from-chep-468945?e=b5cd3a4b5c Want to get the newsletter emailed to you? Complete this form to register for our newsletter and become a CHeP network member.

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Happy Holidays from CHeP
Happy Holidays from CHeP!

Check out our newsletter for the latest funding, events and other opportunities we’ve found for you.

Newsletter Link
http://mailchi.mp/cf23b267c1e3/latest-news-from-chep-468945?e=b5cd3a4b5c

Want to get the newsletter emailed to you?

Complete this form to register for our newsletter and become a CHeP network member.

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Using Gamification to Engage Opioid Addicts in Human-Centered Research https://www.indianactsi.org/gamification-to-engage-opioid-addicts/ Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:29:26 +0000 https://www.indianactsi.org/?p=3015 3 minute read Because of sharp increases in opioid overdoses, emergency doctors at Eskenazi Hospital in Indianapolis developed Project POINT to reach drug users when they are most receptive to change—soon after a near death experience. Now trained staff approach every overdose patient who has received naloxone to talk about recovery options and establish a …

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3 minute read
Game Pieces
Gamification of a traditional research method was used to engage participants in a familiar and highly participatory atmosphere.

Because of sharp increases in opioid overdoses, emergency doctors at Eskenazi Hospital in Indianapolis developed Project POINT to reach drug users when they are most receptive to change—soon after a near death experience. Now trained staff approach every overdose patient who has received naloxone to talk about recovery options and establish a connection to care.

Although Project POINT staff engaged hundreds of patients over two years, not every patient was ready for recovery after being approached in the emergency department. Also, the program has had a difficult time staying connected with these individuals once they leave. To address these challenges, Project POINT leaders approached Research Jam (AKACHeP’s Patient Engagement Core [PEC]) for help with developing effective, targeted, communication strategies to increase patient connection to and maintenance in care.


“Whatever group of fixes there are for this crisis, they will have to be addressed with people who have lived it leading the way.” – Project POINT founder Krista Brucker, MD


Research Jam planned an engagement session for former opioid users at a local community service center. To increase engagement and decrease potential stigma, Research Jam adapted a human-centered design research activity called Experience Mapping. Human-centered design research methods are distinct from conventional research methods because the tools leverage study participants’ expertise in ways that exceed standard expectations for study participation. Traditionally, Experience Mapping is an exploratory activity in which participants are asked to draw out their movements and interactions during a specific experience (e.g. time spent in the hospital after an overdose). An Experience Map can illuminate the holistic highs and lows people experience during an event.

Research Jam created a novel twist of the traditional Experience Mapping activity—a gamified version—with the intention of creating a familiar, engaging, and highly participatory atmosphere. An open, defined space was created for each participant to share perspectives and experiences without hesitation by incorporating character selection and discipline facilitators, i.e., the turn-based format of board games and the interactive elements of party card games.

Question cards were used to guide discussions and facilitate the session.

During the two-hour engagement session with six participants, the game worked as planned and proved to be a successful research tool. All participants shared a wide range of anecdotes and feelings and described in detail previous experiences with overdoses, the criminal justice system, drug treatment programs, and more than requested via the game cards. Participants’ feedback on the session was entirely positive. The Research Jam team was extremely happy with the process and the depth of feelings, needs, desires, and experiences gathered. Although initially skeptical about the novel research activity, the primary investigators identified significant value in the method after the event.

“I saw many of the same themes that I expected to hear based on my experience in this field. However, the PEC was able to pull out nuances that I had not heard before,” said primary investigator Dennis Watson, PhD, Associate Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Indiana University School of Public Health.

Project POINT founder Krista Brucker, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, stressed the importance of engaging opioid users, “The session was such a good reminder that so much of what we (society, healthcare, criminal justice, child protection) have messed up on this front could have been avoided if we had spent more time listening before trying to fix it. Whatever group of fixes there are for this crisis, they will have to be addressed with people who have lived it leading the way.”

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Research Jam Was All IN At The Indiana State Fair https://www.indianactsi.org/research-jam-indiana-state-fair/ Wed, 13 Sep 2017 19:06:52 +0000 https://www.indianactsi.org/?p=2978 3 minute read Last month, Research Jam (AKA CHeP’s Patient Engagement Core) teamed up with their friends at All IN to host a booth at the Indiana State Fair. All IN is a collaborative effort of Indiana University, Purdue University, and Notre Dame that aims to share useful and engaging health and research information with …

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3 minute read
All IN Booth at State Fair
Research Jam developed research activities and helped staff the All IN engagement booth.

Last month, Research Jam (AKA CHeP’s Patient Engagement Core) teamed up with their friends at All IN to host a booth at the Indiana State Fair. All IN is a collaborative effort of Indiana University, Purdue University, and Notre Dame that aims to share useful and engaging health and research information with Indiana residents.

The goal of the All IN booth at the Indiana State Fair was to introduce fair-goers to the initiative and engage them in various activities to gather their thoughts on a few research and health topics. Over the course of 17 days, more than 1,000 fair-goers visited our booth and participated in a total of eight different interactive activities and two surveys. We collected Hoosiers’ opinions on these topics: their views on the role of research, their perceptions about universities, their concerns and knowledge about precision health, their willingness to participate in research studies involving DNA or water and soil samples, and the kinds of health information they value. We also gathered information about their willingness to open the door to their home for a stranger collecting data for research, and asked what they would want in return from a research study that involved their DNA.

All IN surveys at the state fair
Surveys for fairgoers.

Our booth was situated inside the Exposition Hall amongst an eclectic mix of vendors selling everything from hot tubs and cable television to spray vitamins and hairstyling tools. This busy environment and the fact that the population roaming the hall changed from day to day meant that our team was constantly shifting its approach to attracting fairgoers.

Exposition Hall at Indiana State Fairgrounds.
The air-conditioned hall attracted large, browsing crowds.

Our team enticed fair-goers with swag like All IN pens, postcards, and mints and compensated those that participated with “fair bucks” ($1 off coupons for fair concessions) as well as a raffle to win gift cards and an iPad.

For the fair, Research Jam created large-format, engagement activities like this question and answer board.

In the end, we collected approximately 1,000 surveys and hundreds of comments on our interactive activities and took a fun and engaging first step in the introduction of All IN to Indiana residents.


The information gathered by Research Jam and All IN at the fair will serve multiple purposes:

1) To help AllIN shape its upcoming efforts to share information about health and research with Indiana residents.

2) To help the Indiana CTSI and IU School of Medicine communicate about their Precision Health Initiative.

3) To help specific studies within the Precision Health Initiative shape how they communicate with potential participants and what they offer them as part of the study experience.


Learn more about All IN, dedicated to improving the lives of Hoosiers through health knowledge and research.


 

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Adding Community-Engagement to Medical Student Training https://www.indianactsi.org/adding-community-engagement/ Tue, 12 Sep 2017 20:38:21 +0000 https://www.indianactsi.org/?p=2971 For the first time ever, CHeP offered a new type of research experience for medical students participating in this year’s Indiana Medical Student Program for Research and Scholarship (IMPRS). IMPRS is designed to provide a variety of research opportunities including laboratory science, clinical science, and international studies for Indiana University’s first and second year medical …

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For the first time ever, CHeP offered a new type of research experience for medical students participating in this year’s Indiana Medical Student Program for Research and Scholarship (IMPRS). IMPRS is designed to provide a variety of research opportunities including laboratory science, clinical science, and international studies for Indiana University’s first and second year medical students, and this summer CHeP served as a host-site offering exposure to community-engaged research.

Under the mentorship of Dr. Mary Ott, IU School of Medicine, Dr. Heidi Beidinger, University of Notre Dame, Dr. Carrie Lawrence, IU Bloomington, and Dr. Tami Hannon, IU School of Medicine, four IMPRS students were immersed in a summer of community engagement. Projects covered pressing health issues including access to reproductive health services for at risk adolescents, lead poisoning in South Bend, the stigma around accessing treatment to care for injectable drug misuse, and evaluating a type-two diabetes program for youth and their families called PowerHouse. The student’s experiences not only helped move the community-engaged research projects forward, but also added an important dimension to their medical education program. CHeP is excited about this new area of growth and we are looking forward to next year.

If you are interested in mentoring a medical student next summer please contact CHeP at chep@iupui.edu.

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Meet Advisory Board Member Susan Rawl https://www.indianactsi.org/meet-advisory-board-member-susan-m-rawl/ Thu, 01 Jun 2017 19:51:34 +0000 https://www.indianactsi.org/?p=2426 A valuable member of the CHeP Advisory Board, Sue Rawl has served since 2012. A professor of nursing at Indiana University, Sue is also a co-leader of the Cancer Prevention and Control Program at Indiana University Simon Cancer Center. Sue’s research has focused on cancer screening, prevention, early detection as well as quality of life in …

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Sue Rawl
Sue Rawl

A valuable member of the CHeP Advisory Board, Sue Rawl has served since 2012. A professor of nursing at Indiana University, Sue is also a co-leader of the Cancer Prevention and Control Program at Indiana University Simon Cancer Center.

Sue’s research has focused on cancer screening, prevention, early detection as well as quality of life in cancer patients and people living with an ostomy. She and her team develop and test the impact of computer-tailored, patient-centered interventions to increase cancer screening among people at increased risk, including those with limited resources, low literacy levels, and minority populations. Without strong partnerships with community members who provide expert guidance and advice, serving as valuable members of her research teams her work would not be possible. The National Cancer Institute, the National Institute for Nursing Research, the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and the American Cancer Society have funded her work. She has also collaborated on several studies testing nurse-led interventions to improve symptom management and quality of life for cancer patients undergoing treatment and their caregivers.

Sue is actively involved in professional organizations and serves as Immediate Past Chair of the Board of Directors for the American Cancer Society’s Lakeshore  Division. She also is the Immediate Past President of the Midwest Nursing Research Society and has served as a reviewer for the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Defense, and the American Cancer Society.  For her research contributions, Sue has been named as a Fellow in the American Academy of Health Behaviors and the American Academy of Nursing.

Married to her husband Ben for 37 years, Sue has two adult children who are both married, an amazing new grandson (the new love of her life) and a wonderful dog named Cooper.

CHeP is thankful to have Sue on board!

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Trailblazers Share & Celebrate https://www.indianactsi.org/trailblazers-share-celebrate/ Thu, 01 Jun 2017 19:01:23 +0000 https://www.indianactsi.org/?p=2423 On April 5 at the beautiful Indianapolis Central Library, CHeP friends and family gathered  to celebrate the 2015 CHeP Trailblazer Award teams. The day-long event featured presentations from 12 project teams discussing their partnership experiences, research journeys, and exciting outcomes, as well as an opening address given by Dr. Anantha Shekhar, Director of the Indiana Clinical and …

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Trailblazer Award Winners
Trailblazer Award partners gathered in Indianapolis to share and celebrate their projects.

On April 5 at the beautiful Indianapolis Central Library, CHeP friends and family gathered  to celebrate the 2015 CHeP Trailblazer Award teams. The day-long event featured presentations from 12 project teams discussing their partnership experiences, research journeys, and exciting outcomes, as well as an opening address given by Dr. Anantha Shekhar, Director of the Indiana Clinical and Transnational Sciences Institute, and closing remarks from Ann Alley, Director of the Office of Primary Care at Indiana State Department of Health.

Formerly known as Pilot Projects, initiatives at the symposium included obesity, infant mortality, sickle cell disease, diabetes, an adverse drug reaction screener, quality of life in older adults, and yoga for those with brain injuries.

Of the Trailblazer projects, Dr. Shekhar said, “These pilot grants are a great example of the transformation of connecting academics to community members and actually addressing real-life community problems.”

CHeP’s Trailblazer Award is a pilot funding opportunity for community-engaged research projects proposed by community-university partners. All awardees meet quarterly to provide each other support and to create a network as trailblazers in this important field.

To learn more about each of the projects, visit the Trailblazer Symposium webpage where you can access descriptions of each project and video of each of the presentations.

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Trailblazer: Know Your Numbers 46041 https://www.indianactsi.org/trailblazer-know-numbers-46041/ Wed, 31 May 2017 22:14:57 +0000 https://www.indianactsi.org/?p=2408 Since its inception, the Know Your Numbers 46041 health screening program has provided Clinton County residents with blood pressure, blood sugar, and BMI screenings, as well as healthy lifestyle education and referrals to programs and providers to address health risks. Led by Lorra Archibald, Director of Operations for Healthy Communities of Clinton County Coalition (HCCCC), and …

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A promotional brochure was developed for the program by the CHeP communication team.

Since its inception, the Know Your Numbers 46041 health screening program has provided Clinton County residents with blood pressure, blood sugar, and BMI screenings, as well as healthy lifestyle education and referrals to programs and providers to address health risks. Led by Lorra Archibald, Director of Operations for Healthy Communities of Clinton County Coalition (HCCCC), and Vicki Simpson, Clinical Associate Professor at Purdue University’s School of Nursing, the program is a collaborative project between Purdue University, HCCC, and other community partners including Purdue Extension, the Clinton County YMCA, St. Vincent Hospital Frankfort, and IU Health Plans.

Granted the CHeP Trailblazer Award in 2015, the project team both evaluated and expanded the program. After completing a thorough evaluation, they adapted the program to improve data collection. They also added several screening sites to include rural areas of Clinton County and industrial sites.

After expansion the collaborative project completed 1,342 health screenings in one year (an increase of 54 percent). Their data showed 76 percent of participants at regular sites came to health screenings multiple times, indicating a possible increased interest in participants tracking and improving their numbers.

Lorra and Vicki are currently looking for additional opportunities for further growth of the Know Your Numbers 46041 initiative.

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